Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘food’

alpenhaus

I’m republishing this because the Super Bowl is just around the corner, it’s winter, fondue is available and we seem to be going through a 70’s resurgence.  I have even seen fondue pots in Walmart.  Go to Pinterest and type in “fondue”, recipes abound.

 

I know very few people who own a fondue pot, and those that do have never put it to proper use,  Oh, they’ve used it once or twice to keep cocktail weenies warm at a church buffet, or maybe meatballs in grape jelly on a buffet, but never to sit around with friends, dipping crusty bread into gooey, slightly winey, luscious, warm, melted cheese.

I have four electric fondue pots.  I thoroughly recommend an electric fondue pot over the candle or sterno variety. They provide much better temperature control and can expand the fondue experience to vegetables and meats and of course dessert. Although homemade is almost always better, at this time of the year, packaged cheese fondues are available in the specialty cheese sections of most supermarkets. They are actually very good.  The packages store easily and many brands don’t require refrigeration.   Alpenhaus and Swiss Knight are two of my favorites.

Fondue does not need to be reserved for parties. Fonduing (sic) is a great way to engage your family and friends.  It requires little more than active participation and a loaf of crusty bread, though I do like to turn my crusty bread into toasty garlic bread cubes and toss a fresh green salad to complete the meal. My kids grew up with fondue (children of the 70’s) and a childhood friend of my now 40+ yr old daughter recently spoke to me of her fond memory of her first ever fondue at my home. Fondue can be the basis of a very romantic dinner for two also. Remember, it’s said if you lose a cube of bread in the cheese, you must kiss the person sitting next to you;)

And of course, there is homemade. Even better. A very good one from Emeril

Read Full Post »

for almost fifty yearstable1
the table has held testament
to the celebrations of family
and the love within

the table’s small stature
is disguised as a buffet
and belies it’s enormous heart
much like it’s original owner

mother bought the table
when she downsized to her little home
afraid there may be times that
her little kitchen wouldn’t hold us all

daughters and spouses and grandchildren
one by one
friends and family all welcome
to share the occasions of life

and service the table has given
Christmas’ and Easters
weddings and baby showers
birthdays and funerals

The table throws wide its secrets
to seat twelve
an amazing little piece
of furniture

and as another Thanksgiving
draws to a close
I applaud the little table
and give thanks

for another great Thanksgiving
and the 3 generations it held
and pray it will hold our
generations to come

Read Full Post »

It’s been a while since my last post, which if I remember correctly was written during a down moment, just prior to the tailgaiting, partying, playful Super Bowl came to pass. And if I remember correctly I was feeling down, But not today! Nope, not today.

20130209-220430.jpgIt’s funny how doing things for others, creating love, can bring you up and into the clouds. That’s just where I’ve been, floating into the clouds. If you follow my post at all you may remember my marshmallow dream post. I’m back at it, creating super sweet, fluffy little clouds of sugar for valentine’s day.

I have so much fun making these simple, inexpensive, delicious and abundant treats. I have enough to send away to my two young grand-girls in New Hampshire and still have plenty for my favorite teenage granddaughter here in SC. Then I’ll pass out to some of the neighborhood children. I made a two batches, one of fresh strawberry and a another of coconut.

I even cut doilies out of parchment papers to line my boxes.  I fondly remembered the hours I spent as a little girl making these pretty little  pieces of paper.IMG_0134

Nope, no tears today.  Just lots of little puffs of of luv.

Read Full Post »

alpenhaus

I’m republishing this because the Super Bowl is just around the corner, it’s winter, fondue is available and we seem to be going through a 70’s resurgence.  I have even seen fondue pots in Walmart.  Go to Pinterest and type in “fondue”, recipes abound.

 

I know very few people who own a fondue pot, and those that do have never put it to proper use,  Oh, they’ve used it once or twice to keep cocktail weenies warm at a church buffet, or maybe meatballs in grape jelly on a buffet, but never to sit around with friends, dipping crusty bread into gooey, slightly winey, luscious, warm, melted cheese.

I have four electric fondue pots.  I thoroughly recommend an electric fondue pot over the candle or sterno variety. They provide much better temperature control and can expand the fondue experience to vegetables and meats and of course dessert. Although homemade is almost always better, at this time of the year, packaged cheese fondues are available in the specialty cheese sections of most supermarkets. They are actually very good.  The packages store easily and many brands don’t require refrigeration.   Alpenhaus and Swiss Knight are two of my favorites.

Fondue does not need to be reserved for parties. Fonduing (sic) is a great way to engage your family and friends.  It requires little more than active participation and a loaf of crusty bread, though I do like to turn my crusty bread into toasty garlic bread cubes and toss a fresh green salad to complete the meal. My kids grew up with fondue (children of the 70’s) and a childhood friend of my now 40+ yr old daughter recently spoke to me of her fond memory of her first ever fondue at my home. Fondue can be the basis of a very romantic dinner for two also. Remember, it’s said if you lose a cube of bread in the cheese, you must kiss the person sitting next to you;)

And of course, there is homemade. Even better. A very good one from Emeril

Read Full Post »

Fermenting cabbage. Yum. It’s working, and has been for about a week but since it won’t be ready until it tastes like it is, I can relax. I just need to check it every day or two to see it is all still nicely submerged and bubbly. Homemade sauerkraut is incredible, so much better than canned!

Sauerkraut

5-6 lbs fresh cabbage cores
2 oz Kosher salt
5 gallon crock or food grade bucket

Remove and damaged or blemished outer leaves, core, then finely slice into thinnest possible pieces. A mandolin works wonders for this, but I had to use a knife. Measure 5 lbs of the cabbage and place in a large bowl or into your crock, sprinkling salt as you layer. Mix with your hands until very thoroughly mixed. Let stand at least 15 minutes until the juices start to flow. Mix again. Gently pack cabbage into crock pushing down gently. What you want is cabbage with a layer of salty brine above the surface. Place a sterilized plate on top of cabbage. Fill two or three zip-lock bags with water to expand it and prevent any air from reaching the cabbage surface.
These will act as weights on the plate keeping, the cabbage submerged. Set a clean towel over crock to prevent any critters from entering and set the crock in a place where the temperature is maintained at 68 to 72 degrees. Don’t be alarmed if it emits an odor after a day or two. That will disappear as the fermentation starts in earnest. Check every day or two and skim if any scum develops. If water level falls below cabbage surface, add additional brine by mixing 2 teaspoons kosher salt with 1 cup water. Let sauerkraut ferment from 10 days to 2 months. When done, pack into hot sterile jars. Bring brine to a simmer and add to jars leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Process in boiling water bath for 15-20 minutes (pints/quarts). Store in a cool dark place.

Read Full Post »

I’ve been invited to the Thanksgiving luncheon at my previous employer and must find a dish to bring. I always like to include something a little different while the SC natives tend to their traditions. usually bring something New Englandish. Last year it was mashed potatoes and gravy. Would you believe mashed potatoes are not on their ‘must do’ list! I guess this is rice country along the coast and rice is a mainstay of a meal. I’m sure there will be collards and macaroni and cheese. Deviled eggs always attend the party as does sweet potato casserole. The dessert table will be crammed with goodies, and people to full of dinner to really get into most of them. They’ll all strike around 3:00 break time for coffee and whatever is left of the cakes, cookies and pies.
Since I retired 4 yrs ago, It’s always fun visiting with the old crew, seeing their wives and children (all grown up). So what to bring……

Pre-Thanksgiving Spread (That’s my Waldorf in the front corner next to the eggs)


I decided on my twist of a Waldorf Salad

Waldorf Salad Upgraded

9 apples unpeeled but cored and diced (I used a variety of MacIntosh, Granny Smith, and Gala so to have different textures, color and sweet / tart)
2 stalks Celery finely sliced
1/2 Cup Mayonnaise
1/2 Cup Heavy Cream whipped
1/2 Cup Pomegranate Craisins (pomegranite seeds might be nice instead)
1/2 Cup Maple sugared walnuts (see recipe)
1/16 teas Chinese Five Spice powder
sprinkle of ground ginger
sprinkle of ground cardamon

Whip cream and set aside. Blend mayonnaise with spices. Add celery and craisins to diced apples in bowl. Stir in Mayonnaise mixture. Fold whipped cream into apple mixture. Refrigerate. Prepare Walnuts.

Maple Glazed Walnuts with Cayenne
adapted from recipe by fifteenspatulas

3 Tbl maple syrup
sprinkle of cayenne
sprinkle of salt

Heat a skillet to hot. Add walnuts and toast until nuts are heated thru and piping hot. Sprinkle with a good dose of cayenne and salt. Slowly pour syrup in side of skillet (carefully as it will bubble up and spit) Stir nuts around until coated. Remove from heat. Set aside to cool completely. When completely cool, scatter over apples in bowl. Toss walnuts with apples just before serving.

Read Full Post »

Thanksgiving time and I’m remembering so many happy Thanksgivings spent with my parents and sisters. When my sisters and I were younger, Thanksgiving meant High School football. Natick vs. Framingham rivals like no other. We always made our own pom-poms from red and blue crepe paper rolls and mom would buy us colored crysanthamums to wear on our jackets. While we cheered our team on, mom was busy in the kitchen at home preparing our Thanksgiving dinner. It was always served at the big dining room table, covered in white linen. Our dishes with the pretty pink flowers would be filled with turkey and dressing and all the fixings. Through the years, Thanksgiving day followed almost the same pattern. Because I was the youngest child, the game continued to be a big part of the day, but my sisters married and sometimes shared the day with their spouse’s families. One year, with just the three of us (Mom, Dad and me) it was decided we would eat out. A more beautiful setting for Thanksgiving than the Wayside Inn there will never be.

It was there I discovered Grape-nut pudding. Served warm with whipped cream, I fell in love with the silky custard and slightly nutty crust. In the years that have passed, I’ve never tried making my own until now. I searched my beloved copy of ‘Fanny Farmer Cookbook’ and scoured the internet to come up with what I felt was a suitable recipe. Of course I took my favorite three and took a little bit from each.

Now, more is not always better. Every now and then, I ‘tweak’ a recipe. Here we go, first, I adjusted the eggs, but only because in separating one of them, I broke the white into my bowl and ditched the yolk. I was supposed to use 2 eggs and 2 yolks. Now I had 2 eggs and 1 white. To correct the error I just added another egg, and what the heck, I added another yolk too. I beat up my eggs with the sugar and vanilla and tempered them nicely. Then I decided that 1/2 cup of Grape-Nuts sounded wanting. They looked lost floating around in that quart of milk. So I added another 1/2 cup. What I didn’t count on is, they expand! They plump up to 3 times their size! They are like oatmeal or cornmeal. They take over and suck up all that milk. We ate it anyway, covered in more milk and lots of whipped cream, not a total disaster, but not at all like I remembered way back 50 yrs ago. Lesson learned.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Chasing Destino

I'll be outside of the mosh pit . . . waiting with bandaids and kleenex . . . I can also work magic with an ace bandage. Just sayin' . . .

Ray Ferrer - Emotion on Canvas

** OFFICIAL Site of Artist Ray Ferrer **

joeseeberblog

This WordPress.com site is the cat’s pajamas

Hiking Photography

Beautiful photos of hiking and other outdoor adventures.

Cast Light

In the moment, everyday

lostcompanion

Alcoholism

Depression Time

A journal about depression, panic, and creating a life of clarity, balance, and meaning.

breezes at dawn

the breezes at dawn have secrets to tell you... ~ Rumi

cancer killing recipe

Just another WordPress.com site

THE RIVER WALK

Daily Thoughts and Meditations as we journey together with our Lord.

%d bloggers like this: